News

Our union has provided information to help IT employees navigate the new IT structure. The new structure was implemented on July 1, 2019.

Across the nation, women are creating change for working families more than ever before. The Women’s Leadership Academy is ready to train more AFSCME women to be leaders of that change.

Workers Memorial Day is this Sunday, April 28, when we honor workers killed or injured on the job. On this day in 1971, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was formed.

For almost half a century, OSHA has been charged with helping to ensure safe and healthy working conditions for men and women across this country. But under the Trump administration, OSHA is failing us. As we observe Workers Memorial Day, it’s clear that we can do more – much more – for worker safety.

Jacquie Jones-Walsh (center) with Bill Lucy, outgoing CBTU President and Alice Goff, former AFSCME Council 36 President

Megha Desai is a public defender in Multnomah County, Oregon. In a given week, she might work upwards of 60 hours. Right now, she has about 145 open cases.

“It's like a conveyor belt. Every day you work on your assigned cases, new ones roll in,” said Desai, a member of Local 2805 (Council 75). “There's a joke in the office: If you don't come in on the weekends, you’re screwed for the next week.”

The first weekend of April was an exception: It was her wedding. 

OLYMPIA, Wash. — On Wednesday, community and family gathered to honor fallen and injured Washington State Department of Transportation workers.

This week marks the 2019 National Work Zone Awareness Week. In Washington State, DOT worker safety remains a significant issue. According to WSDOT, 11 workers lost their lives due to work zone crashes, and 422 workers were injured just in 2018.

At the worker memorial, an honor guard of 60 WSDOT workers commemorated the service and lives of the 60 workers killed on the job in Washington since 1950.

OLYMPIA, Wash. — When this year’s snow storm hit, the Evergreen State College failed to consider the economic impact on its lowest paid employees, denying them suspended operations pay. But 74 members took action, joining together in a group grievance.

“Everyone who was hourly was shocked. It was electric across campus. People were mad,” said Emmie Forman, a program coordinator in the Academic Dean’s Office since 2008.

OLYMPIA, Wash. - Employees at Washington's state-owned psychiatric hospitals say there's an urgent need to boost funding for their facilities, citing growing safety concerns for staff and patients.